Let’s call it a good question.

by xenatisch

I was asked today to fill in a part in my Facebook® by a friend. The part was entitled: The people who inspire you, oh man, it took me 3 hours to think about 5 people who inspire me the most in different aspects. There result, however, turned own quite interesting. It was as follows:

In the area of Philosophy of Mind and Politics:

Dr Jean Paul Sartre was a French existentialist philosopher, playwright, novelist,screenwriter, political activist, biographer, and literary critic. He was one of the leading figures in 20th century French philosophy, existentialism, and Marxism, and his work continues to influence fields such as Marxist philosophy, sociology, critical theory and literary studies. Sartre was also noted for his long polyamorous relationship with the feminist author and social theorist Simone de Beauvoir. He was awarded the 1964 Nobel Prize in Literature but refused the honour.

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In the area of Philosophy of Science:
Professor Dr Richard Dawkins FRS, FRSL is a British ethologist and evolutionary biologist. He is an emeritus fellow of New College, Oxford, and was the University of Oxford’s Professor for Public Understanding of Science from 1995 until 2008. Dawkins came to prominence with his 1976 book The Selfish Gene, which popularised the gene-centered view of evolution and introduced the term meme. In 1982, he introduced into evolutionary biology an influential concept, presented in his book The Extended Phenotype, that the phenotypic effects of a gene are not necessarily limited to an organism’s body, but can stretch far into the environment, including the bodies of other organisms. Dawkins is an atheist and humanist, a Vice President of the British Humanist Association and supporter of the Brights movement. He is well known for his criticism of creationism and intelligent design. In his 1986 book The Blind Watchmaker, he argued against the watchmaker analogy, an argument for the existence of asupernatural creator based upon the complexity of living organisms.
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In the area of Science and Technology:
Dr Firouz Naderi is an Iranian-American scientist and the Associate Director of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), responsible for Project Formulation and Strategy. He received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from USC (writing his dissertation in the area of digital image processing) and joined JPL in September 1979. His career at JPL has spanned system engineering, technology development, and program and project management for satellite communications systems, Earth remote sensingobservatories, astrophysical observatories and planetary systems He was named head of the Mars Exploration Program at JPL in 2000 after the Program had suffered two consecutive failures. In the summer of 2000 he helped re-plan the Program as a chain of scientifically, technologically and operationally interrelated missions with a spacecraft launch to Mars every two years. He led the Program for the next five years, a span of time that included the successful landing of the Mars Exploration Rovers, Spirit and Opportunity.
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Art of Photography:
Ansel Adams was an American photographer and environmentalist, best known for his black-and-white photographs of theAmerican West, especially in Yosemite National Park. One of his most famous photographs was Moon and Half Dome, Yosemite National Park, California. With Fred Archer, Adams developed the Zone System as a way to determine proper exposure and adjust the contrast of the final print. The resulting clarity and depth characterized his photographs and the work of those to whom he taught the system. Adams primarily used large-format cameras despite their size, weight, setup time, and film cost, because their high resolution helped ensure sharpness in his images. Adams founded the Group f/64 along with fellow photographers Edward Weston and Imogen Cunningham, which in turn created the Museum of Modern Art’s department of photography. Adams’s photographs are reproduced on calendars, posters, and in books, making his photographs widely distributed.
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Humanism and Legendary:
Oskar Schindler was an ethnic German industrialist born in Moravia. He is credited with saving almost 1,200 Jews during the Holocaust by employing them in his enamelware and ammunitions factories, which were located in what is now Poland and the Czech Republic respectively. He is the subject of the novelSchindler’s Ark, and the film based on it, Schindler’s List.
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Art of Screenwriting:

Dr Abbas Kiarostami

is an internationally acclaimed Iranian film director, screenwriter, photographer and film producer. An active filmmaker since 1970, Kiarostami has been involved in over forty films, including shorts and documentaries. Kiarostami attained critical acclaim for directing the Koker Trilogy , Taste of Cherry, and The Wind Will Carry Us. Kiarostami has worked extensively as a screenwriter, film editor, art director and producer and has designed credit titles and publicity material. He is also a poet, photographer,painter, illustrator, and graphic designer. Kiarostami is part of a generation of filmmakers in the Iranian New Wave, a Persian cinema movement that started in the late 1960s and includes pioneering directors such asForough Farrokhzad, Sohrab Shahid Saless, Bahram Beizai, and Parviz Kimiavi. The filmmakers share many common techniques including the use of poetic dialogue and allegorical storytelling dealing with political and philosophical issues.


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Political Theorist:


Professor Dr Henry Kissinger a German-born Americanpolitical scientist, diplomat, and recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize. He served as National Security Advisor and later concurrently as Secretary of State in the administrations of Presidents Richard Nixon and Gerald Ford. After his term, his opinion was still sought by many following presidents. A proponent of Realpolitik, Kissinger played a dominant role in United States foreign policy between 1969 and 1977. During this period, he pioneered the policy of détente with the Soviet Union, orchestrated the opening of relations with the People’s Republic of China, and negotiated the Paris Peace Accords, ending American involvement in theVietnam War. His role in the bombing of Cambodia during this period remains controversial, as well as other interventions abroad such as the Nixon administration’s tacit support of the Pakistani Army in East Pakistan during the Indo-Pakistani War of 1971, with documents showing that US officials working in diplomatic institutions within Bangladesh using the terms selective genocide in reference to the Pakistani Army’s atrocities, actions which prompted widespread criticism and condemnation both by Congress and the international press.


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Movie Director:



Martin Scorsese is an American film director, screenwriter, producer, actor, and film historian. He is the founder of theWorld Cinema Foundation and a recipient of the AFI Life Achievement Award for his contributions to the cinema, and has won awards from the Oscars, Golden Globe, BAFTA, and Directors Guild of America. Scorsese is president of The Film Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to film preservation. Scorsese’s body of work addresses such themes as Italian-American identity, Roman Catholic concepts of guilt and redemption, machismo, and violence. Scorsese is widely considered to be one of the most significant and influential American filmmakers of his era, directing landmark films such as Taxi DriverRaging Bull and Goodfellas – all of which he collaborated on with actor and close friend Robert De Niro. He won the Academy Award for Best Director for The Departed and earned an MFA in film directing from theNew York University Tisch School of the Arts.

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Acting:


Al Pacino 

is an American

film and stage actor and director. He is most famed for playing mobsters including Michael Corleone in The Godfather trilogy and Tony Montana in Scarface, though he has also appeared several times on the other side of the law—as a police officer, detective and a lawyer. His role as Frank Slade in Scent of a Woman won him the Academy Award for Best Actor

in 1992 after receiving seven previous Oscar nominations.


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Politician:



Former President Dr Bill Clinton

served as the

42nd President of the United States from 1993 to 2001. At 46 he was the third-youngest president. He became president at the end of the Cold War, and was the first baby boomer president. Clinton has been described as a New Democrat. Some of his policies, such as the North American Free Trade Agreement and welfare reform, have been attributed to acentrist Third Way philosophy of governance, while on other issues his stance was left of centre. Clinton presided over the continuation of an economic expansion that would later become the longest period of peace-time economic expansion in American history. The Congressional Budget Office reported a budget surplus in 2000, the last full year of Clinton’s presidency. After a failed attempt at health care reform, Republicans won control of the House of Representatives in 1994, for the first time in forty years. Two years later, in 1996, Clinton was re-elected and became the first member of the Democratic Party since Franklin D. Roosevelt to win a second full term as president. Later he was impeached for perjury and obstruction of justice in connection with a scandal involving a White House intern, but was subsequently acquitted by the U.S. Senate.




These were my answers!


 

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